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Frequently asked questions

What are the focus areas in Health and Physical Education?

The Health and Physical Education curriculum contains twelve focus areas. The focus areas provide the context through which the content descriptions and achievement standards are taught and assessed. The focus areas are not discrete topics. This means that when designing teaching and learning programs, a teacher may draw on more than one focus area. 

Advice about the inclusion of the focus areas across the bands is provided in the band descriptors. It is expected that each focus area identified in each band description contribute substantially to the health and physical education teaching and learning program for that particular band of learning. Decisions about specific timing for when each focus area will be taught within the two-year band are the responsibility of the school. For example, a school may decide to teach about safety to the Year 3 cohort and have only a minor coverage for the Year 4 cohort. 

For a list and description of the focus areas see Health and Physical Education Structure 

Is 'respectful relationships' part of Health and Physical Education in the Victorian Curriculum?

Learning about respectful relationships will draw from content in both Health and Physical Education and the Personal and Social Capability in the Victorian Curriculum. 

The Health and Physical Education curriculum develops knowledge, understandings and skills to promote respectful relationships and safety. Through the Personal and Social Capability, students learn about how relationships are developed and understand and develop interpersonal skills to establish and maintain respectful relationships.

More information about the place of respectful relationships in Health and Physical Education can be found in  Learning in Health and Physical Education

How does Home Economics (Food) link to Health and Physical Education within the Victorian Curriculum?

A Home Economics teaching and learning program will draw content from the both Health and Physical Education and Design Technologies in the Victorian Curriculum. 

Content drawn from the Health and Physical Education curriculum will focus on food and nutrition, and making healthy choices. Assessing nutritional information and exploring the range of influences on healthy food choices is included in this curriculum area.

Content from the Design and Technologies curriculum is drawn from the food specialisation context. The characteristics and scientific and sensory principles of food selection and preparation are included in this curriculum area. Students are required to design and prepare food for specific purposes and consumers. 

More information about the place of home economics in Health and Physical Education can be found in Learning in Health and Physical Education

Is Outdoor Education part of Health and Physical Education in the Victorian Curriculum?

Elements of learning in Outdoor Education will draw on content from across the Victorian Curriculum F–10, including Health and Physical Education, Geography, Science and Personal and Social Capability. The primary content drawn from Health and Physical Education will be in the areas of outdoor recreation and the influence of connection to place and communities on health and wellbeing. In the Health and Physical Education curriculum, outdoor recreation refers to recreational activities or the act of engaging in recreational activities. These are typically associated with outdoor, natural or semi-natural settings. 

More information about the place of outdoor education in Health and Physical Education can be found in Learning in Health and Physical Education.

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