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Assessment

Accreditation period Units 1-4: 2023-2027

General assessment advice

The principles underpinning all VCE assessment practices are explained in VCE assessment principles.

Updates to matters related to the administration of VCE assessment are published in the VCAA Bulletin.

Advice on matters related to the administration of Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) assessment is published annually in the VCE and VCAL Administrative Handbook.

The procedures for managing VCE school-based assessment are explained in Assessment advice for the VCE.

The glossary of command terms provides a list of terms commonly used across the Victorian Curriculum F–10, VCE study designs and VCE examinations and to help students better understand the requirements of command terms in the context of their discipline.

VCE Art Creative Practice Study Design examination specifications, past examination papers and corresponding examination reports can be accessed from the VCE Art Creative Practice examination webpage.

Graded Distributions for Graded Assessment can be accessed from the VCAA Senior Secondary Certificate Statistical Information webpage.

Excepting third-party elements, schools may use this resource in accordance with the VCAA’s Educational Allowance (VCAA Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy).

Unit 1: Interpreting artworks and exploring the Creative Practice

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss the practices of three artists, and apply the Structural Lens and the Personal Lens to analyse and interpret one artwork by each artist. (See Study Design, page 19.)

Assessment task type

  • an extended written response
  • short-answer responses supported by visual references
  • an annotated visual report
  • a presentation using digital technologies such as an online presentation or interactive website
  • an oral presentation

Selecting artists

The selection of artists should expand the perspectives of the student. Consider local artists and the interests of the students. The study of three artists must meet the following requirements:

  • At least one artist who has worked in a different period
  • At least one contemporary artist
  • At least one Australian artist
  • The relationships between the artist and the audience through the artwork (collaboration)

The following table provides a key for the suggested artists:

KEY
FNA

First Nations Australian artist

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

COLL

Collaborative artist

Collaborates with other artists, technicians or audience as part of their practice

CON

Contemporary artist (post 2000)

Practice is influenced by contemporary ideas, materials, techniques, processes or approaches

HIST

Historical artist (pre-2000)

From an historical period that has used traditional art form(s), materials and techniques


  • Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (Raphael) (1483–1520) Italian. Narrative painting, humanism. HIST, COLL
  • Hilma af Klint (1862–1944) British. Watercolourist, identity, and spirituality. HIST, COLL
  • Edward Burra (1905–1976) British. Large-scale watercolours of African American culture, 1930’s Harlem. HIST
  • Marlene Gilson (1944– ) Australian. Narratives of her ancestorial land that re- evaluates history. FNA, CON
  • Badger Bates (1947– ) Australian. Lino, wood cut, carving. Barkandji elder (lower Darling River) whose works are about his connection to the river and its ecosystems. CON, FNA
  • Grayson Perry (1960– ) British. Ceramics and tapestries, themes relate to identity, interior landscapes and personal obsessions. CON
  • Tracey Moffatt (1960– ) Australian. Film, photography and video, works often of a narrative nature, Indigenous concerns. CON, COLL
  • Vik Muniz (1961– ) Brazilian / American. Memory perception use of metaphor to recreate iconic artworks with new contemporary meanings that ask the audience to question. COLL CON
  • Tracey Emin (1963– ) British. Mixed media including installations, works are biographical and often of a confessional nature. CON
  • Jules de Balincourt (1972– ) French / American. Saturated colourful paintings on the human cost of mainstream culture. CON
  • Laith McGregor (1977– ) Australian. Drawing, painting and sculpture. Intricate drawings using ballpoint pen reflect on ideas to do with portraiture and identity. CON
  • Vincent Namatjira (1983– ) Australian. Figurative painter whose works deal with issues to do with First Nations people. CON, FNA

Unit 1 Outcome 1 Sample: Research and analysis

For an explanation of the Interpretive Lenses refer to Study Specifications in the Learning approaches.

Students view historical and contemporary artworks. They research, analyse and interpret.
Include for each artist:

  • Artist, Date of birth / Death, Nationality
  • Title, Date, Technique / Medium, Subject matter, Image
  • Historical or Contemporary

Research

Choose artists for whom there is sufficient background information so that the inquiry can be deep and broad. The sources should be many, varied and reliable. Acknowledge and record all sources.

Describe

  • Use the Interpretive Lenses; refer to the elements and principles.
  • What do you see and / or hear? Include both the physical object and the visual and/or aural elements and principles. Imagine you’re describing it for someone who can’t see it. Start with a general overview and then become detailed.

Analyse

  • How did the artist make the work? Examine and discuss the materials, techniques and processes.
  • What aesthetic (visual) decisions did they make?
  • Does the origin, location or presentation of the work influence the audience interpretation? This considers the context of the work.

Interpret

  • What message is the artist trying to communicate to the audience?
  • How and why did they do that?
  • How do the art elements / principles help to communicate meaning?
  • How has the artist used symbolism?
  • Who was the intended audience at the time the work was made?
  • How would an audience from a different time react?

Opinion

  • Formulate and justify an opinion. What do I think or feel?
  • What do I think of the artwork? Why?
  • What evidence supports your response?

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use the Creative Practice to develop and make visual responses informed by their exploration of personal interests and ideas. (See Study Design, page 20.)

Assessment task type

Students produce a range of personal visual responses to a selection of set tasks, showing the exploration of ideas, materials and techniques in at least three art forms. Finished artworks are not an expectation of this outcome but can be considered in the student’s use of the Creative Practice.

Outcome 2: Sample for visual responses

Students explore at least three art forms. They respond to a range of artworks, ideas and the practices of artists through experimentation and exploration. They build skills using materials, techniques and processes, and explore areas of personal interest to develop and make visual responses.

Students investigate the practices of selected artists as inspiration for their personal visual responses. From their personal investigation of artists and their practices, students develop a range of visual responses through a series of tasks in three different art forms.

Note: no finished works are made.

The teacher selects a minimum of three different art forms

  • Art form1:
  • Art form 2:
  • Art form 3:

Exploration and experimentation

  • How have the selected artists used the art form? Can this be replicated by the student?
  • Experiment with different art materials, techniques and processes to discover their specific characteristics.
  • Which of the explorations of materials, techniques or processes are most interesting? Why?
  • Does the material, technique or process have a limit?
  • How far can the materials, techniques, or processes be taken?
  • How can one get the best result from the material, technique, process?

Personal visual response

  • Try a range of different personal approaches in response to artworks. This could include sketches, models, samples and / or trials.
  • Keep the visual response open-ended as the goal is to gain understanding and develop skills and not to make finished works.
  • Reflect on the themes and subject matter of the artists / artworks studied. How do the themes and subject matter relate to the student’s life?
  • What ideas arise from the explorations? Can these ideas be extended?
  • Is a personal style (visual language) emerging? Use art language to describe it.

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to document and evaluate the components of the Creative Practice used to make personal visual responses. (See Study Design, page 21.)

Assessment task type

Students document their use of the Creative Practice, including annotated personal visual responses to a selection of set tasks.

Outcome 3: Sample prompts for documenting and evaluating visual responses

Students develop their art practice by responding to the ways in which artists conceptualise, develop and make their artworks. They provide annotated documentation of their experiences in Making and Responding in a form appropriate to their art practice. Students reflect on their research and exploration undertaken in Area of Study 2 and understand that evaluation and documentation are integral components of the Creative Practice. The following are suggested activities:

  • Progressive critical reflections are made during the exploration and experimentations in Area of Study 2.
  • Use photos, sketches or diagrams to document and evaluate the techniques and processes.
  • Evaluate exploration and experiments and personal visual responses.
  • Use the language from the Interpretive lenses to annotate.

These questions can be used to assist the students with their documentation, evaluation and reflection:

  • What did you do?
  • How did you do it?
  • What did you find out?
  • What will you do next?
  • What will you not repeat? Why?
  • How do your exploration and experiments and visual responses relate to the inspiration?
  • What art materials, techniques and equipment are you using? How?
  • Has the technique been successful in translating your ideas to the audience?
  • What art process are you using? How?
  • Is the style of the piece figurative, abstract or something else?
  • Explain how the specific artist / artwork / process has influenced your visual responses.
  • What are your visual responses doing? Do they tell a story? Evoke a feeling or emotion? Document an event? Present an idea? Explain where and how this occurs in the response.
  • Do the visual responses introduce a thought, concept, idea and / or make you think on a higher level?
  • What do you want your audience to feel or experience?
  • Discuss how you used Art Elements and Principles.
    • What colours are used? What is the dominant colour scheme in the visual response?
    • What form does the visual response have?
    • In what ways has line been used?
    • Which shapes can you see and how are they used?
    • Does the visual response have real or implied texture? How important to the visual response is the texture?
    • What tonal range is used? How? Where?
    • Have you used light in the form of lighting, illumination or projection?
    • Did you use sound, either live or recorded?
    • Does the response happen over time? Is it a live installation or performance, or is it recorded?
    • What is emphasised (focal point). How is this done?
    • Where and how can you see movement being represented?
    • Does rhythm have a role in the work?
    • What creates a sense of unity in your response?
    • Have you created variety in the response? How?
    • In what way does repetition or pattern occur in your response?
    • How does the visual response feel balanced or unbalanced? Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
    • Where and how have areas of high or low contrast been used?
    • Is there anything out of proportion? How does it affect the visual response? Why did you change the proportion?
    • Is there a sense of depth in the response? Have you used space in any way?
    • How have you considered scale? Is the response extremely large, or extremely small compared to the size of a person?

Unit 2: Interpreting artworks and developing the Creative Practice

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use the Cultural Lens, and the other Interpretive Lenses as appropriate, to analyse and compare the practices of artists and artworks from different cultures and times. (See Study Design, page 24.) 

Assessment task type

  • an extended written response
  • short-answer responses supported by visual references
  • an annotated visual report
  • a digital presentation such as an online or interactive presentation
  • an oral presentation

Selecting artists

Apply the Cultural Lens and other lenses as appropriate to study the practices of at least three artists from different cultures and times. Students research, analyse, interpret and compare historical and contemporary artworks including the artists and audience. Tasks should be developed to measure student achievement of the following knowledge and skills.

The three artists studied need to address at least two of the following criteria combined:

  • an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person
  • an artist who collaborates with other artists, technicians or with the audience as part of their practice
  • an artist from an historical period that has used at least one traditional art form and traditional materials and techniques
  • a contemporary artist whose practice is influenced by contemporary ideas, materials, techniques, processes or approaches.

NOTE: One artist may cover more than one criterion.

The following table provides a key for the suggested artists:

KEY
FNA

First Nations Australian artist

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

COLL

Collaborative artist

Collaborates with other artists, technicians or audience as part of their practice

CON

Contemporary artist (post 2000)

Practice is influenced by contemporary ideas, materials, techniques, processes or approaches

HIST

Historical artist (pre-2000)

From an historical period that has used traditional art form(s), materials and techniques


  • Shin Saimdang (1504­–1551) Korean. Painter, calligraphist poet – nature, plants, insects. HIST
  • Kazimir Malevich (1879–1935) Russian. Painter – non-objective art, avant-garde. HIST 
  • John Thomson (1837–1921) Scottish. Photographer – people, landscapes, artefacts. HIST 
  • May Morris (1862–1938) British. Artisan – arts and crafts. HIST, COLL 
  • Albert Namatjira (1902–1959 Australian First Nations. Painter, mostly watercolour – Central Australian landscapes in a ‘western’ style; the images are evocative of deep connection to the land. HIST, FNA 
  • Emily Kngwarreye (1910–1996) Australian, Anmatyerre language group. Paintings and textiles – traditional Dreamtime stories. HIST, FNA, COLL 
  • Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) French-American. Large scale sculpture and installation. HIST, CON 
  • Andy Warhol (1928–1987) American. Pop artist – diverse output of screen prints, films and objects. Collaborated with technical assistants especially at The Factory. HIST, COLL 
  • Chuck Close (1940–2021) American. Paintings and prints primarily concerned with portraiture. Collaborated frequently with master printers. COLL, HIST, CON 
  • Marina Abramovic (1946– ) Serbian. Performance artist, concerned with issues about the body and endurance. Most works require(d) audience participation, also collaborated with fellow artist Ulay (Uwe Laysiepen). COLL, HIST, CON
  • Zaha Hadid (1950–2016) British-Iraqi. Architect, painter – urban development. HIST, CON 
  • Abbas Kiarostami (1940–2016) Iranian. Photography, painting, film stills, films – narratives. HIST, CON 
  • Barbi Kjar (1957– ) Australian. Painting, printmaking, works on paper. COLL, HIST, CON 
  • Sally Smart (1960– ) Australian. Painting, printmaking, photography, large-scale assemblage installation – identity politics. COLL, HIST, CON
  • Joan Ross (DOB unknown– ) Scottish / Australian. Multimedia artist, works mostly in assemblage and video; investigates the legacy of colonialism in Australia, particularly its effect on Indigenous Australians. COLL, HIST, CON
  • Yinka Shonibare (1962– ) British-Nigerian. Painting, sculpture, mixed media, installations, photography, film – cultural identity, colonialism, post-colonialism. COLL, HIST, CON
  • Lisa Kristine (1965– ) American. Photographer – humanitarian, unity, justice. HIST, CON
  • Kaylene Whiskey (1976– ) Australian. Heroic women, pop culture idols. FNA, HIST, CON

Artisans and workshops

  • Craft Guilds c.1250–1850. COLL, HIST
  • Medieval Monks 5th–15th centuries. Illuminations. COLL, HIST 
  • Medieval Workshops / Guilds 5th–15th centuries. COLL, HIST
  • Robert Campin
  • Jacques Daret
  • Guild of St. Luke 
  • Renaissance Artist Workshops 14th–17th centuries. COLL, HIST
  • Lorenzo Ghiberti 1378–1455 Italian
  • Piero della Francesca 1420–1492 Italian 
  • Pietro Perugino 1450–1523 Italian 
  • Painters Guild of Bruges 
  • Historical Female. COLL, HIST
  • Sofonisba Anguissola 1532–1625
  • Artemisia Gentileschi 1593–1653
  • Judith Leyster 1609–1660
  • Elizabeth Vigee Le Brun 1755–1842
  • Rosa Bonheur 1822–1899
  • Berthe Morisot 1841–1895
  • Mary Cassatt 1844–1926
  • Georgia O’Keeffe 1887–1986 
  • Ukiyo-e Artists 1620–present, Japanese. COLL, HIST
  • Harunobu 1725–1770
  • Utamaro 1753–1806
  • Hokusai 1760–1849
  • Kunisada 1786–1865
  • Hiroshige 1797–1858
  • Academic Art 1648. French Academy. HIST, COLL
  • Arts and Crafts Movement – late 19th to early 20th century, British. HIST, COLL  
  • De Stijl Design Group 1917–1731, Dutch. HIST, COLL 
  • Deutscher Werkbund 1907–1933, German. HIST, COLL 
  • Bauhaus Design School 1919–1933, German. HIST, COLL 
  • Minimalism 1960s, American. HIST, COLL 
  • Artworkers Guild 1884 to present day, British. HIST, COLL
  • Papunya Tula Artists Cooperative 1972 to present day, Australian. FNA, COLL, HIST, CON 
  • Utopia Women’s Batik Group 1978; became Utopia Art Movement. FNA, COLL, HIST, CON
  • Australian Print Workshop 1981 to present day, Australian. HIST, CON, COLL
  • Tjanpi Desert Weavers 1995 to present day, Australian. NPY lands. FNA, COLL, HIST, CON 
  • Baldessin Press 2001 to present day, Australian. CON, COLL
  • The Artists Guild, operating today to support women artists, Australian. COLL, CON  
  • Collaborative Mentorship Initiative, Australian. CON

Outcome 1: Sample questions for research and analysis

For an explanation of the Interpretive Lenses also refer to Study Specifications and Learning approaches in the support material.

The Comparison Tables in Unit 4 may be useful for gathering information for this task.

Structural Lens

  • Compare the materials, techniques and processes used by the artist(s). Do they vary, according to the time and place that they were used?
  • Are there similarities or differences between the aesthetics of the works? Discuss.
  • Do the artists use symbols to communicate? How? Are there similarities or differences in the ways the artists do this?

Personal Lens

  • Are there similarities between the lives of the artists? Is this reflected in their work? How?
  • Did the artist(s) work in isolation, or collaboratively? How has this influenced the work?
  • Does the artist(s) have specific beliefs that are relevant to the work?
  • Have the life experiences of the artist(s) influenced the work? How?
  • Do the specific beliefs of the audience affect their response to the works? How?
  • How would a contemporary audience of the artist(s) have responded to each of the works?
  • How do you (the student) respond to each of the works? Are you drawn to one more than the others? Why?

Cultural Lens

  • How have the time periods in which the artists worked influenced them? How is this evident?
  • Does a contemporary audience interpret the works differently to the original audience? Why?
  • Do the artists make work that responds to political events? How is this evident?
  • Do the artists subscribe to a spiritual or philosophical ethos? How is this explored in their work?
  • Have economics influenced the artists? Did their socioeconomic situation influence their subject matter? Did they have access to materials, or have they used found or repurposed materials?
  • Has the work of the artists changed in financial value? How does this affect the interpretation of the work?
  • Does the ethnic background of the artists bring art practices and visual elements to the works?
  • Is the gender of the artists reflected in their work? How?
  • Do the artists ask their audiences to consider ethical issues?
  • Do the practices of the artists provoke shock or disgust? Why?
  • How do these factors contribute to engagement and communication of meaning?

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use the Creative Practice to explore social and cultural ideas or issues to make and present at least one finished artwork using collaborative approaches. (See Study Design, page 25.)

Assessment task type

  • visual responses that demonstrate the use of the Creative Practice, collaboration and the exploration of personal ideas related to social and cultural contexts
  • presentation of at least one finished artwork that realises the intentions of the student and demonstrates the refinement of materials, techniques and processes

Outcome 2: Sample approaches for exploring collaborative Creative Practice

Working with other students to make a collective artwork

  • Develop a theme and respond individually but display together
  • Respond to a prompt and swap imagery
  • Create half each of an artwork
  • Group drawing shuffle
  • Make a set of prints; swap a print with another student, respond to their print by printing onto it
  • Set up a pen-pal arrangement with someone from elsewhere; pose art problems and share solutions
  • Make a section or segment of work that becomes part of the whole
  • Randomly match students to create a collaborative work
  • Create an art exchange with another class / school

Working with a practising artist

  • An artist in residence may incorporate sections of student work into an installation
  • Working in the studio of a practising artist, the student makes works inspired and informed by the artist
  • The student participates in workshops led by a practising artist
  • Contact a local gallery for artist-led workshops

Working with a specialist

  • Work with a teacher / department / faculty specialist within the school, or from another school
  • Work with a master printer at a printmaking studio
  • Have works cast by a local foundry
  • Have images printed by a commercial digital printer
  • Have student-designed textile prints produced through a commercial company or online company
  • Seek assistance to develop a skill such as welding, woodworking, sewing
  • Participate in workshops in a special field

Involving or collaborating with the audience

(The audience could be local, international, other students, teachers or family members.)

  • Seek audience stories as a basis for narrative works
  • Create a work that invites the audience to take a piece away with them
  • Design a work that is completed by the audience entering, or adding their own mark

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to critically reflect on, evaluate and document their use of the Creative Practice to develop and make collaborative visual responses. (See Study Design, page 26.) 

Assessment task type

  • documentation of the Creative Practice, in the form of critical annotations, that presents explorations in selected art forms, and demonstrates the development of the student’s collaborative practice
  • a critique of the development of personal ideas, directions, explorations, visual language, technical skills, processes and artworks. The critique can be presented orally and should be accompanied by written and visual documentation
  • evaluation of the Creative Practice and the presentation of finished artworks
  • evaluation of visual responses that effectively communicate social and cultural meaning

Outcome 3: Sample approach and questions for documentation and evaluation

Students are required to reflect on their exploration and experimentation in art making throughout Area of Study 2. Examples of reflection and evaluation can include the following.

  • Make progressive critical reflections during the exploration and experimentations in Area of Study 2.
  • Use photos, sketches or diagrams to document and evaluate the making and responding.
  • Evaluate the exploration of materials and experiments and personal visual responses.
  • Use the language from the Interpretive lenses to annotate.
  • Discuss how cultural ideas and issues are represented in their artworks.

Conduct a critique on aspects of Creative Practice response to collaborative artists before finishing artworks. There are further details of how to structure a critique under ‘Developing a program’ and also in the teaching and learning activities for Unit 3, Area of Study 1.

Document and respond to feedback to resolve artwork. Answer the following questions:

  • What was unexpected? unintended? intuitive? discovered? developed? explored?
  • What was the purpose or intention of the work?
  • What did the student do effectively?
  • What was the inspiration behind the work?
  • What makes you curious?
  • What could be improved?
  • What is the strongest part of the work?
  • What has the student shared about their work?
  • What was compromised in the work?
  • What has the student learned?

In the teaching and learning activities for Unit 1 Area of Study 1 there are some prompt questions. Teachers can use these prompt questions along with the additional questions below to help with the documentation of collaboration and the presentation of the critique.

  • Who did you work with?
  • Did you have shared aims and objectives? What were they?
  • How did you find working to a common agenda? What problems arose? How did you resolve them?
  • Did someone have a specific skill?
  • Did everyone have equal input?
  • Were you able to cooperate?
  • Was the process intimidating? Why?
  • Would you work in a collaboration again? Why?
  • Was someone ‘in charge’? Why? Was this helpful?
  • Did you have a shared vision? Did you deviate from this as the work evolved?
  • Did you communicate well?
  • Was it difficult to trust each other’s judgment?
  • Did you need to compromise? Did this help to make the work more successful?
  • What was gained through the collaboration?

For the critique:

  • Who did you collaborate with? Why?
  • How did you collaborate?
  • Which artforms were explored?
  • Which artists were studied?
  • What needs to be developed further: techniques / processes / visual language, personal ideas?
  • What expected / unexpected directions has the work taken?
  • What explorations have been completed? What needs to be completed?
  • Is there evidence of visual language development? How?
  • Is there development of technical skills?
  • How do the visual responses communicate social and cultural meaning?
  • Where to now?

Unit 3: Investigation, ideas, artworks and the Creative Practice

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to develop personal ideas using research that examines one artwork and the practice of an artist, and produce at least one finished artwork using the Creative Practice. (See Study Design, page 28.)
Assessment task type – School-assessed Task

The following assessment task forms a section of the School-assessed Task. Further advice and assessment criteria for the School-assessed Task will be published annually by the VCAA in the VCE Art Creative Practice: Administrative Advice for School-based Assessment.

  • A presentation of the research conducted by the student, using any one or a combination of the following:
    • a written report of 300–500 words with documented visual evidence
    • an annotated visual report
    • a critique presented in a digital format, such as an online presentation
      or interactive website
    • an oral critique with documented visual and written evidence.

AND

  • At least one finished artwork that responds to the ideas explored using the Creative Practice.

Unit 3 Outcome 1: Sample approach for research and exploration

There is information about the Creative Practice, Research-based art practice and Critical and Creative Thinking in the Learning Approaches section of the support materials.

Further advice will be provided annually by the VCAA in the Art Creative Practice: Administrative Information for School-based assessment published.

Selecting artists

The following table provides a key for the suggested artists:

KEY
FNA

First Nations Australian artist

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

COLL

Collaborative artist

Collaborates with other artists, technicians or audience as part of their practice

CON

Contemporary artist (post 2000)

Practice is influenced by contemporary ideas, materials, techniques, processes or approaches

HIST

Historical artist (pre-2000)

From an historical period that has used traditional art form(s), materials and techniques


Rosalie Gascoigne (1917–1999) Australian. COLL.
Vipoo Srivilasa (1969– ) Thai-born Australian. CON.
Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778) Italian. HIST.
Edward Weston (1886–1958) American. HIST.
Claude Cahun (1894–1954) and Marcel Moore (1892–1972) French. HIST.

Unit 3 Outcome 1 Project checklist

Research and explore

Completed
Artist 1

Completed
Artist 2

Researched and documented one artwork (inspiration)

 

 

Identified ideas and / or issues

 

 

Explored own ideas in response to the inspiration / ideas / issues

 

 

Experimented with ideas and technical skills

 

 

Research and explore
Refined ideas, technical skills and visual language

 

 

Applied Interpretive lenses

 

 

Used art terminology

 

 

Reflected on personal ideas

 

 

Developed visual language

 

 

Resolved finished artwork(s)

 

 

Preparation for the critique
Prepared the Body of Work and finished work for presentation

 

After the critique Make notes
What questions were asked? 
During the critique 
What did you learn from the feedback? 
What will you continue with in Area of Study 2? 
What will you do differently in Area of Study 2? 
Will you continue with this theme / investigation, or begin afresh? 

Preparing for the critique

There is further information about the critique in the ‘Developing a program’ section as well as the Teaching and learning activities.

In preparation for the critique in Unit 3 Area of Study 1 there are a series of questions that the student can consider that are focused on the Interpretive lenses.

Questions to consider

Structural Lens

  • Which artist, and which work, was your source of inspiration?
  • Does your subject matter respond to or resemble that of the artist(s)? If so, how?
  • Are there similarities or differences between the aesthetics of your work and the artists’ works?
  • Have you employed symbolism? Does this relate to the inspiration you took from the artist(s)?
  • What materials did you use? Has the artist(s) used the materials differently?
  • Have the techniques you used changed or developed?
  • Has your use of elements or principles taken inspiration from the artist(s)? If so, how?
  • Compare the processes used by the artist(s) to your own. Does the process change? Why?

Personal Lens

  • Did the artist(s) work in isolation, or collaboratively? How has this influenced your use of them as inspiration?
  • Does the artist(s) have specific beliefs that are relevant to the work? Were they relevant to you?
  • Have your life experiences or those of the artist(s) influenced the work? If so, how?
  • Do you think that the specific beliefs of the audience will affect their response to the works? If so, how?

Cultural Lens

  • How have the time periods in which the artist worked influenced them? How is this evident? Was it an influence on the way you used the inspiration?
  • How would an audience contemporary to you interpret the work differently to a previous audience? Why?
  • Is your response linked to social, ethical or political issues / views? If so, how?
  • Does the artist subscribe to a spiritual or philosophical ethos? Did you explore this in your work? If so, how?
  • Have economics or environmental concerns influenced your work? Did you have access to materials, or have you used found or repurposed materials?
  • Does your or the artist’s ethnic background bring art practices and visual elements to the work? If so, how?
  • Is gender reflected in the work? If so, how?
  • Does the artwork provoke an emotional response? If so, why?
  • How do these factors contribute to engagement and communication of meaning?

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply and explore ideas and an area of personal interest using the Creative Practice.

Assessment task type – School-assessed Task

The following assessment task will form a section of the School-assessed Task. Further advice and assessment criteria for the School-assessed Task will be published in the VCE Art Creative Practice: Administrative Advice for School-based Assessment published by the VCAA annually.

  • A documented Body of Work that presents explorations and the development of personal ideas within selected art forms, using the Creative Practice and including reflective annotations.

Outcome 2: Sample approach for personal investigation

There is information about the Creative Practice, Research-based art practice and Critical and Creative Thinking in the Learning Approaches section of the support materials.

Further advice will be provided in the Art Creative Practice: Administrative Information for School-based assessment published by the VCAA annually.

Guiding questions

  • How can my Body of Work expand on the topics and ideas I explored in Area of Study 1?
  • What components of the Creative Practice will I use to explore and develop my Body of Work?
  • What are the characteristics of my visual language and how does it communicate my personal ideas and interests?

Starting points

  • Encourage students to consider the idea they explored in Outcome 1.They may like to investigate the idea they explored in response to the artwork they selected in a different way.
  • They could select a different artwork by the same artist or a different artist and respond to the ideas expressed by the artist or conveyed by the artwork.
  • Students may choose to be inspired by the practices of other artists, and explore materials, techniques, processes and art forms inspired by them, to find a way of exploring ideas of personal interest to them
  • They must use the Creative Practice to progressively explore and develop the idea, through the investigation and experimentation with materials, techniques and processes. This exploration can be done in an art form or range of art forms.
  • Students can decide if they will continue to explore the idea from Area of Study 1 or explore a new idea.
  • Consider the feedback the student received from their critique. What suggestions were made that could guide them in moving forward?
  • Research artworks and images that relate to their chosen idea, interests, materials or approaches
  • Create a mind map / brainstorm to explore a selected idea and to provide options moving forward.
  • Begin creating a visual brainstorm using drawing, painting, collage or photography to create visual interpretations of ideas.

Interpretive Lenses

  • Students are required to apply the language of selected and explicitly identified Interpretive Lenses to support reflective annotation of their art making.
  • They should select Interpretive Lenses that are appropriate to their ideas and artworks.

Questions to focus on developing a Body of Work

Once the students have completed their initial research they may start to plan their exploration using the following questions.

  • What will your focus be?
  • Are you aiming to visually interprets ideas or issues?
  • Do you intend exploring a particular subject matter that appeals to you?
  • Would you like to work in a particular style or approach to making art?
  • Is there a specific medium or art form you would like to use?

Key areas of the School-assessed Task for Outcome 2

The students will commence their exploration using the above starting points. They then outline the ideas that they want to focus on and explore them visually using annotated sketches that they evaluate.

Students should conduct the following:

  • Explore a range of materials, techniques, processes
  • Consistently document all aspects of the Creative Practice to reflect on their art making using critical annotations
  • Consider and evaluate their visual language
  • Use the Interpretive Lenses to reflect on their trials and how their visual language achieves their intention

Establish some key observation periods throughout Unit 3 that the teacher can provide the student with feedback on their Creative Practice.

Unit 4: Interpreting, resolving and presenting artworks and the Creative Practice

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to document their use of Creative Practice and present a critique to inform the refinement and resolution of a Body of Work. (See Study Design, page 32.)

Task type – School-assessed Task

A critique of the development, refinement and resolution of personal concepts, ideas, directions, explorations and the use of visual language in artworks.

AND

A documented Body of Work that presents ongoing explorations and development of personal concepts within selected art forms, using the Creative Practice and including reflective annotations.

Unit 4 Outcome 1: Sample approach for documentation and critique of the Creative Practice

There is information about the Creative Practice, Research-based art practice and Critical and Creative Thinking in the Learning Approaches section of the support materials.

Further advice will be provided in the Art Creative Practice: Administrative Information for School-based assessment published annually by the VCAA.

Documentation and evaluation

Area of Study 1 is taught concurrently with Area of Study 2. At the commencement of Unit 4, students should use the feedback from the critique to refocus their Body of Work. They use their visual journal to reflect on decisions and directions and include sketches and photographs. The following questions will assist the students with their documentation and evaluation.

Personal visual responses

  • What am I communicating in my personal visual responses? How am I doing that?
  • Do I need to expand on my ideas?
  • How have I planned and structured my responses?

Materials, techniques and processes

  • How have I used and refined materials, techniques and processes?
  • Do I need to investigate these more? Can I improve the way I have used them?

Interpretive Lenses

  • Have I applied the Interpretive Lenses to inform my ideas? How are these evident?

Visual language

  • Is my personal visual language clear? How have I used art elements and principles?
  • What do I need to do to improve my visual language?

Refinement and resolution

  • Use the refinement and resolution aspect of the Creative Practice to reflect upon and document refinement and resolution including:
  •  resolving ideas and visual language in artworks
  • resolving points of view and interpretations of the meanings and messages of artworks, using critical judgment and the Interpretive Lenses
  • realising and refining artworks through the selection and manipulation of materials, techniques and processes
  • refining the use of visual language to communicate ideas and meaning in artworks
  • refining technical skill in the use of materials, techniques and processes in art forms to communicate ideas and meaning in artworks
  • considering the presentation and display of artworks in different contexts to communicate ideas and meaning.

Presentation

Students should document their plans for the presentation of their Body of Work for the critique. They should plan the context for the presentation of the Body of Work and how it best presents their intentions and use of the Creative Practice. Students can go through the Creative Practice and document the steps used to develop, refine and resolve their Body of Work.

Importantly they should consider the ideas and meanings they are communicating to their audience and how the context will influence the response and interpretation of the audience or viewer.

Critique

There is advice regarding the critique in ‘Developing a program’ and also the teaching and learning section for Unit 4 Area of Study 1.  

Since the critique in Unit 4 is the presentation of the Body of Work for final feedback and resolution, students should review their documentation to assist them in structuring their critique. The areas they could focus on include:

  • further refinement of personal visual responses
  • refinement of materials, techniques and processes in selected art forms
  • refinement and resolution of visual language
  • use of the Interpretive Lenses in refinement and resolution
  • ideas and meanings communicated in the Body of Work.

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use the Creative Practice to resolve and present a Body of Work. (See Study Design, page 33.)

Task type – School-assessed Task

A Body of Work that resolves personal concepts, ideas and explorations using the Creative Practice, including the presentation of one or more finished artworks that resolve the student’s intentions.

Unit 4 Outcome 2: Sample approach for documentation and critique of the Creative Practice

There is information about the Creative Practice, Research-based art practice and Critical and Creative Thinking in the Learning Approaches section of the support materials.

Further advice will be provided in the Art Creative Practice: Administrative Information for School-based assessment published annually by the VCAA.

Since Outcome 2 is taught concurrently with Outcome 1 it is important that students plan their Body of Work in their visual journal. At the start of Unit 4 students should review their visual responses and documentation of their Unit 3 Body of Work.

Reflect and evaluate

Students reflect on the Body of Work from Unit 3 and consider:

  • What ideas have emerged, what techniques and processes have been employed?
  • What trials or responses have not been extended.? Is there room for improvement?
  • What technical problems arose? How were these resolved?

Thinking about the original intention of the Creative Practice, consider:

  • What was the starting point?
  • What inspired the investigation?
  • Has this continued, or changed?

Students then plan what is needed to refine and resolve the Body of Work. They must focus on a specific art form. They should consider how they will further develop and refine their ideas using the art form.

  • Are there ways of expanding on those ideas or is a change in direction required?
  • What is needed to begin to refine and resolve the Body of Work?
  • When must the work be ready for presentation?

Students can then develop a time plan to progressively resolve the Body of Work. The plan could be structured similar to the following example.

Task list
Art form

 

Ideas to be further refined

 

Materials techniques and processes

 

Interpretive Lenses to be used

 

Visual language to be refined and developed

 

Planned presentation format

 

Context for presentation

 

Schedule
Week

Plan

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

7

 

8

 

9

 

Refine and resolve

Students work through the list to progressively resolve the Body of Work. During this time, they consider the context within which the works would best be viewed. Students investigate the presentation of artworks in a range of exhibition spaces. How have other artists presented similar work?

Student should consider the format for their presentation; it could be a digital display or a dedicated installation space. They need to consider lighting and how the work is displayed in the space.

The interpretation of the audience compared to the intentions of the artist is important so students should consider their audience for the art work.

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to compare the practices of historical and contemporary artists, and use the Interpretive Lenses to analyse and interpret the meanings and messages of selected artworks. (See Study Design, page 34.)

Unit 4 Outcome 3: Sample approach for the comparison of artists, their practices and artworks

This task requires students to research two artists, their practices and artworks. Students analyse and interpret the artworks using the Interpretive Lens and support their interpretations using evidence from the artworks.

Students must:

  • research at least one historical artist, their practice and their artworks, and at least one contemporary artist, their practice and their artworks
  • compare the practices of the selected artists
  • apply all three Interpretive Lenses to analyse and interpret the meanings and messages of at least two artworks by each artist
  • source evidence to support their interpretation and point of view.

Applying the Interpretive Lenses

Students will select their artists and then begin to use the Interpretive Lenses to analyse and interpret artworks. In addition to the questions below, they should refer to the explanation of the Interpretive Lenses in the Study Specifications on page 14 and 15 of the study design.

Comparative tables

Structural Lens:

  • What materials, techniques and processes do the artists use? How does this influence their ideas?
  • Have the techniques used changed or developed over time?
  • Compare the processes used by the artist(s).
  • Do they change according to the time and place that they were used?
  • Are there similarities or differences between the aesthetics of the works?
 

Materials, techniques and processes

Signs and symbols

Meanings and messages

Artist 1

 

 

 

Artist 2

 

 

 

Artist 3

 

 

 

Similarities

 

 

 

Differences

 

 

 


Personal Lens:

  • Did the artist(s) work in isolation, or collaboratively? How has this influenced the work?
  • Does the artist(s) have specific beliefs that are relevant to the work?
  • Have the life experiences of the artist(s) influenced the work? How?
  • Do the specific beliefs of the audience affect their response to the works? How?
  • How would a contemporary audience have responded to each of the works?
 

Collaboration with other artists / working with artisans / interacting with the audience

Individual beliefs, values, ethics, philosophies

Life experiences, family, health

Audience point of view

Artist 1

 

 

 

 

Artist 2

 

 

 

 

Artist 3

 

 

 

 

Similarities

 

 

 

 

Differences

 

 

 

 


Cultural Lens:

  • How have the time periods in which the artists worked influenced them? How is this evident?
  • Does a contemporary audience interpret the works differently to the original audience? Why?
  • Do the artists make work that responds to political events? How is this evident?
  • Do the artists subscribe to a particular spiritual or philosophical ethos? How is this explored in their work?
  • Have economics influenced the artists? Did they have access to materials, or have they used found or repurposed materials?
  • Has the work of the artists changed in financial value? How does this affect the interpretation of the work?
  • Does the ethnic background of the artists bring art practices and visual elements to the works?
  • Is the gender of the artists reflected in their work? How?
  • Do the artists ask their audiences to consider ethical issues?
  • Do the practices of the artists provoke shock or disgust? Why?
  • How do these factors contribute to engagement and communication of meaning?
 

Race, ethnicity, religion, beliefs, values, traditions

Location, geography, place, environment

Political and / or socio-economic context

Cultural variation between audience and artist

Artist 1

 

 

 

 

Artist 2

 

 

 

 

Artist 3

 

 

 

 

Similarities

 

 

 

 

Differences

 

 

 

 


Sample approach to developing the School-assessed Task

Decide on the conditions under which the task will be conducted

This practical task is worth one quarter of the assessment for Units 3 and 4, the total of which is out of 60 marks.

Students should complete the task over five weeks in Term 1, working both in and outside of class time. They should be advised to use the majority of the class time for practical work, making and responding visually, and a small proportion of class time or out-of-class time continuing research and documenting the Creative Practice (note: documentation is not assessed in Outcome 1 but is concurrent with it).

Students use the Creative Practice to respond to research they undertake into the practice of an artist, developing a Body of Work. From this they go on to refine and resolve a finished work. In Week 5 they present a critique to reflect upon and evaluate their Body of Work, including the finished work. The Outcome requires the Body of Work, the critique and the finished work.

Authentication of the task is ongoing. The teacher should sight the developing Body of Work each week and complete Authentication documentation as specified in the VCE Creative Art Practice Study Design.

Preparing and delivering the task

The timeframe of this task should be made clear at the beginning to allow students to use their time well.

The teacher may select the artist and artwork to set a common theme and ensure all students have access to quality research / resources or they may allow the student to choose the artist and artworks they study. When selecting artists, it is important to choose artists for whom there is sufficient background information so that the inquiry can be deep and broad. Artists for whom social media is the primary source of information should be used with great caution. It is important that students see that their study of artists and artworks are part of artistic practice and can inform and inspire their art making.

In delivering this task, teachers should clarify the intention of using an artwork as a starting point. It should be clear that the student is not to copy the work; rather, to respond to it.

Once the artist and artwork have been selected the student investigates these through the Interpretive Lenses. They generate creative responses to the key themes, techniques or processes, using expansive, creative thinking. They trial visual responses and refer regularly to the initial source of inspiration. The student then refines their visual response into a resolved finished artwork. Due to the limited timeframe the teacher may need to place limits on the scope of the artwork.

Students present their Body of Work, including the finished work, in a critique. This may be to other students and the teacher, to one other student, to the teacher or to a respected other. To ensure that the critique is succinct but thorough the teacher may provide a checklist, a schedule and a time limit. The teacher may provide a list for the audience to support engagement with the critique. This could include an agenda, such as:

  • Introduction of inspiration (artist / artwork)
  • Display and explanation of visual responses
  • Reflection on strengths and weaknesses of the responses
  • Presentation of and reflection on the finished work
  • Questions from audience
  • Feedback from audience.

Following the critique, the student reflects on the feedback and sets a course of action for Area of Study 2.  Students will have the option to continue to develop Outcome 1 ideas in Outcome 2, but the Outcome 1 artwork must not extend into Outcome 2.

Marking the task

Unit 3 and 4 Outcomes 1 and 2 will be assessed as a part of the whole Body of Work. The marking scheme used to assess a student’s level of performance should reflect the relevant aspects of the criteria, evidence and descriptors. Advice regarding the School-assessed Task is published annually. The criteria, evidence and descriptors should be unpacked and explained to the students before they commence the task.

Sample approach to developing School-assessed Coursework

Unit 4 Outcome 3

Task type: Extended response

Decide on the conditions under which the task will be conducted

This task is worth 30 marks and constitutes 10 per cent of the study score for VCE Art Creative Practice. This will be developed as one task.

Students should complete the task in 100 minutes of class time. They can research the artists and background material that covers the key knowledge and skills for the task but will have not have access to the questions prior to the class. In selecting the assessment task(s), be aware of your cohort, timing, and where this task sits in relation to teaching Unit 4.

The questions for student responses must allow students to address all the key knowledge and skills for the Outcome. Therefore they must be structured so that students can demonstrate their knowledge of artists and artworks.

Students must cover the key knowledge and skills of the outcome while writing on one artist, their artistic practices and artworks produced before 2000, and one artist, their artistic practices and artworks produced since 2000. They must compare the artists with a detailed analysis of at least two artworks by each artist. Students must apply relevant aspects of the Interpretive Lenses across each of the selected artworks to interpret and compare meanings and messages.

Preparing and writing the task

The teacher may select the artists and works to set a common theme and ensure all students have access to quality research / resources. Or a teacher can mandate one or both artists, mandate one of the artist’s works and provide a choice or selection of artists who work with the same theme. Or a teacher can allow students to choose the artworks and artists they study. It is important that students see the relationship between the two outcomes in Unit 4 and that their study of artists and artworks forms part of artistic practice and can inform and inspire their art making.

In preparing for this task, teachers can provide imagery, background or related information. Teachers may choose to allow students to use notes based on resources or lectures. Notes and resources could be collected and collated in a variety of ways; for example, in a traditional folder, in a digital format (such as bookcreator or iBooks Author), or as a printed booklet with questions based on the Interpretive Lenses and spaces for responses. Should teachers wish to offer students an exam-type experience, notes would not be allowed.

Once the information is collated, using the comparative table under Interpretive Lenses can highlight the similarities and differences between the works students are studying.

Students identify techniques and styles used by each artist and collect research related to each artwork. Students should identify and be able to describe specific examples of techniques fundamental to each work.

Through their study of art elements, art principles, techniques and style, students should identify facets that have symbolic messages and should be encouraged to form a coherent meaning about these. These symbolic meanings are independent of those uncovered through the use of Personal or Cultural Lenses.

Comparing is a fundamental skill in this outcome. Students should be aware that comparison requires the study of similarities and differences in qualities / areas.

Marking the task

The marking scheme used to assess a student’s level of performance should reflect the relevant aspects of the performance descriptors and be explained to students before they commence the task.

Authentication

Authentication issues can be minimised if the students complete an assessment task of structured questions conducted under test conditions.

Assessment rubrics / performance descriptors provide a guide to the levels of performance typically demonstrated within each range on the assessment task(s). The performance descriptors for each outcome identify the qualities or characteristics expected in a student response.

Unit 4 Performance descriptors


2024 Administrative Information for School-based Assessment

VCE Art Creative Practice: Administrative Information for School-based Assessment in 2024

Professional Learning videos for School-based Assessment

Watch a series of on-demand videos to provide teachers with an understanding of the delivery of the School-assessed Task, including authentication, administration and how to apply the assessment criteria and descriptors for the School-assessed Task.